Category Archives: Los Angeles Wedding Coordinator

How to Hire a Wedding Planner or Coordinator

By | Day of Coordinator, Event Planner, How to choose wedding vendors, Los Angeles Wedding Coordinator, Los Angeles Wedding Planner, Malibu Rocky Oaks Wedding | No Comments

I blogged about five questions to ask a coordinator or planner a few years ago, and I’m now writing today with a more in-depth article on how to find and choose one – reflecting the current needs of brides and grooms today.

 Consider exactly what service you want. The past two years, I’ve seen the number of wedding coordination bookings lessen, and surging ahead in popularity are my Partial Planning and custom consultation packages.  The reason is, people are strapped for time and need expertise given to them quickly and accurately.  These services save couples money in the long run; we often can pre-negotiate and warn clients of costly missteps when we are more intensively involved in the planning process. Also, having a life while you are planning your wedding is nice, too.

Weddings at private estates, like this intimate affair at Malibu Rocky Oaks Vineyard, take intensive time and labor to pull off flawlessly. Photo by Dave Richards Photography.

Weddings at private estates, like this intimate affair at Malibu Rocky Oaks Vineyard, take intensive time and labor to pull off flawlessly. Photo by Dave Richards Photography.

Do your research on pricing.  Comparable-quality vendors have similar price points.  If one or two are out of wack from the majority of quotes you are getting, ask them why.  Some vendors are newer and less expensive; be sure you can trust their work and check their references.  I also talk about this in a recent podcast, here – knowledge is power, and being educated will allow you to discuss pricing in a fair and effective manner with a potential vendor.

“Day of” Is a misnomer.  Every now and then I receive a call from a potential client who insists they only need a “day of coordinator” just to “run the day”.  I understand there may be some information or opinion floating about there in the universe that allows someone to think that a coordinator does not need to be involved till, say, a few days prior.  Many times I’ve stepped into an event 3-4 weeks prior and there are a significant amount of final elements left undone – like a proper timeline, linen count, final menu choices, etc. etc.   And certainly, there are also clients where at 2 months out, they are already rock solid with a lot of details. But consider a coordinator an agent of final due diligence and essential project management, speaking with all the vendors and passing info from to another, and correcting some things and adjusting others.  We can spot a disaster waiting to happen, too – a seemingly innocuous detail can cause serious issues on the day of, and we’ll hone in on those potential issues.  We’ll chase down info from vendors, and chase down info from the client FOR the vendors. The vendors don’t all talk to each other; they need someone to connect the dots.

All set and ready to go...starting a ceremony on time takes careful prep in the weeks prior to the big day. Photo by True Photography. Venue: Calamigos Malibu. Florals: McCann Florist.

All set and ready to go…starting a ceremony on time takes careful prep in the weeks prior to the big day. Photo by True Photography. Venue: Calamigos Malibu. Florals: McCann Florist.

 

I’ve seen massive holes left un-addressed and even if everything is locked up tight, I need to be prepared before the day of so I know how to manage everything. Otherwise, I’ll be constantly behind the curve and scrambling to keep up – and guess who will be to blame if anything goes wrong, that could have been fixed ahead of time? That’s right- the coordinator.

My value for showing up on one day – with no prep work – is at least several hundred dollars. My day rate for working for caterers as a floor manager, for example, is around $350 for 8 hours.  Add a few more hours of time at the event; and acknowledging I work 30 weekends a year usually so I have to make it worth my while; and, add the assistant I MUST have (no matter how big or small the wedding), you’re looking at almost 1k.   So, it makes sense to get the whole set of wedding coordination services for a little more money, and get way more value out of the caring hand-holding and resourcefulness of a coordinator working just for you.

My book The Five Biggest Wedding Planning Myths has more must-have info about planning your wedding, and my door is always open at dee@noworriesep.com. Happy planning!

 

Modern First Dance Songs: Summer/Fall 2015

By | Los Angeles Wedding Coordinator, Los Angeles Wedding Planner, Music | No Comments

The most challenging aspect of planning can sometimes be picking the perfect first dance song.  I’ve been keeping my ear to the ground, listening for newer, special songs that can work for your first dance.

1. Coming Home – Leon Bridges.  This song is deceptively simple…but it pretty much says it all about love. Being with your true love really is like coming home, a place of comfort that is always there for you.

MorshedWedding821

Photo by Brady Puryear

2.  Flaws – Bastille.  This  may sound counterintuitive to the couple blissfully inlove, but I learned after a few years of marriage is how the single most important concept of couplehood is admitting your flaws and working on them, but accepting your significant other’s imperfections, and, even embracing them.  It’s called a “wonderful mess” in the song, and I love that idea – perfection is overrated!

Photo by Brandon Kidd Photography

Photo by Brandon Kidd Photography

3.  The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face – Here’s a classic song that I have not heard at a wedding until just recently, and deserves a second look.  A dear friend of mine got married recently and they had talented friend of theirs sing this song (originally sung by Roberta Flack).  It’s beautiful and truly timeless. This version is a live version sung by Leona Lewis.

Social Media and Cell Phone Rules for Weddings

By | Cell Phones at Weddings, Continuum Weddings, Continuum Weddings Photography, Facebook, Los Angeles Wedding Coordinator, Los Angeles Wedding Planner, Shani Barel Photography, Social Media at Weddings, Uncategorized | No Comments

With social media and technology, things are constantly evolving – first we had Friendster, then Facebook, now Snapchat – it’s hard to keep up! But there are a few hard and fast rules for social media and cell phones at weddings, it just takes some careful communication to be sure your guests are aware.

The only time it's appropriate to check your Facebook feed:  When you change your status at the altar from Single to Married!  Photo by Continuumweddings.com

The only time it’s appropriate to check your Facebook feed: When you change your status at the altar from Single to Married! Photo by Continuumweddings.com

1.  Have your officiant tell guests to put their phones down.  It’s like a scene from TMZ: You’re walking down the aisle, and all you can see are cell phones snapping away!  If you don’t want this, be sure to have your officiant take his or her place, and then make a brief announcement, before the rest of the processional.

Or, have a young bridal party member lovingly and charmingly remind guests to turn off their cell phones!  Photo by Shani Barel.

Or, have a young bridal party member lovingly and charmingly remind guests to turn off their cell phones! Photo by Shani Barel.

 

2.  Then, whip out the hashtag signs…or not.  If you do want up to the moment memories saved on ‘the cloud,’ create and research a hashtag before the wedding and print out small signs to put on the bar, cocktail tables, and near the photobooth.  That gives permission to then snap away and post on Instagram and Facebook.  Or, if you want social media silence the entire night, be sure to have your officiant mention that as well at the ceremony.

Appropriate: A quick cell phone shot amongst close family and friends before the ceremony. Photo by Shani Barel.

Appropriate: A quick cell phone shot amongst close family and friends before the ceremony. Photo by Shani Barel.

 

3.  Have a party online.  Our favorite apps are Wedding Party and Bonfyre, for private, invite-only news feeds of photos and comments of the party, during the party.  If you have a laptop connected to a projector, you can even show a live feed at the reception.  Definitely a way to blend social media into a live event without sacrificing the meaningful person-to-person interaction of a wedding.

With these tips, you can better offer an intimate environment for your wedding ceremony and yet provide an online experience for guests as well. Happy planning (and snapping, posting, sharing…)!

Smart Ways to Stay On Budget for Your Wedding

By | Budget Los Angeles Wedding, Budget Weddings, DIY, How Much Do L.A. Weddings Cost, Los Angeles Wedding Coordinator, Realistic Wedding Budget, Wedding Planner | No Comments

It’s every bride and groom’s biggest concern:  Budget.  Many couples get a sense of sticker shock when they find out how much weddings cost, and justifiably so.  While the end result is a beautiful day and celebration that in some ways is priceless, there’s no getting around the fact that spending a certain sum on ‘one day’ can be uncomfortable.

When thinking about saving money but preserving the vibe of your event, keep these things in mind:

1.  The extras.  You don’t always need that something ‘extra’. For example, gold leaf on your cake can be pricey; buying a roll of exquisite satin gold ribbon instead can save a significant amount of money.  Letterpress invites are lovely; but not necessary. Flat printed invitations look beautiful and are elegant enough without the additional charges.

We created this sweet centerpiece with inexpensive greenery and sunflowers, using a pitcher that we sourced from the rental company for that evening's event. Photo by Lorenzo Hodges.

We created this sweet centerpiece with inexpensive greenery and sunflowers, using a pitcher that we sourced from the rental company for that evening’s event. Photo by Lorenzo Hodges.

2.  Food!  Food is one of your biggest costs, as is venue (particularly if the venue is lumped in with food, such as when hosting an event at a hotel).  If working an out of the box space where you can provide your own food server, be careful about using a food truck or taco cart. These are great options for saving money, but you need additional staff to properly serve at the bar and clean up at the end of the night.

A space like the Millwick in downtown LA (http://marvimon.com/Millwick) already has some kitchen infrastructure, lighting, and dining tables and chairs, allowing for savings on outside rentals. Food trucks are also doable at this space.

A space like the Millwick in downtown LA (http://marvimon.com/Millwick) already has some kitchen infrastructure, lighting, and dining tables and chairs, allowing for savings on outside rentals. Food trucks are also doable at this space.

3. Decor.  Beware DIY tips online – there are some awesome tutorials out there, but when you see a photo of a stunning decor idea that is labeled cost effective or DIY, ask yourself, ‘how much would the labor cost?’ Hanging lights, large floral pieces, etc – all those projects cost in labor, and anything that requires going up a ladder means serious liability risks.  So be sure to factor the labor in to any supposedly ‘easy’, ‘inexpensive’ DIY project.

A professional event planner’s goal should always be to create a gorgeous and lovely day without sinking a client’s budget.  It takes innovation, experience, and familiarity with cost controlling procedures.  Typically working with an event planner can save you money and keep you at budget.  (Some statistics say the average couple otherwise goes over budget by 30%.)  There are also all sorts of wacky fees (“administrative charge,” “AV liaison fee,” etc) that can rear their ugly heads when clients least expect it, whereas event planners frequently see them coming long before they are an issue. I often recommend to a couple on a tight budget to hire a planner just to do a budget consultation.  That way, they have a good idea of all those scary unknowns, and have the most accurate information on realistic pricing.  This consultation also gives them solid strategies for progressing along their planning process with extensive wisdom based on a pro’s experience.  Then the planner can become involved again a couple months out and serve as day of coordinator to bookend the entire process.

Once your goals for each wedding expense are locked in, you can proceed with authority and way less stress. For more about budgets, check out our past blog posts here and here. Happy planning!

 

Real Wedding: Romance, Beverly Hills-Style

By | Beverly Hills Hotel, Brady Puryear Photography, Los Angeles Wedding Coordinator, Los Angeles Wedding Planner, Sky Event Productions, Wedding Coordinator | No Comments

We had the opportunity to work at one of the most romantic getaways in the city, the Beverly Hills Hotel, for this gorgeous August wedding. The clients were a dashing, intelligent couple with excellent taste; the wedding had Persian elements celebrating their culture and lush florals from one of our favorite vendors, Sky Event ProductionsAfsaneh Sargordan designed the sofreh, and the cake came from Joanie and Leigh’s Cakes.  Rounding out the A-plus team of vendors are Golnar Djahanbani (officiant),  TMMPro (lighting) and Vidicam (videography), and of course, photos by Brady Puryear, whose work you see below.

Photo by Brady Puryear

Photo by Brady Puryear

Photo By Brady Puryear

Photo By Brady Puryear

Photo by Brady Puryear

Photo by Brady Puryear

Photo by Brady Puryear

Photo by Brady Puryear

MorshedWedding417

Lighting by TMMPro; photo by Brady Puryear

Lighting by TMMPro; photo by Brady Puryear

Cake by Joanie and Leigh; photo by Brady Puryear

Cake by Joanie and Leigh; photo by Brady Puryear

Photo by Brady Puryear.

Photo by Brady Puryear.

Lighting by TMMPro; photo by Brady Puryear.

Lighting by TMMPro; photo by Brady Puryear.

Photo by Brady Puryear, florals by Sky Productions

Photo by Brady Puryear, florals by Sky Productions

Photo by Brady Puryear

Photo by Brady Puryear

Photo by Brady Puryear

Photo by Brady Puryear

MorshedWedding396

Photo by Brady Puryear, florals by Sky Productions

Photo by Brady Puryear, florals by Sky Productions

 

 

 

The Five Biggest Wedding Planning Myths: Myth #5 – “I can DIY my entire wedding!”

By | 5 Biggest Wedding Planning Myths, Budget Weddings, DIY, Jackie Combs Lotus and Lily, Katie Robertson Photography, Los Angeles Wedding Coordinator, Los Angeles Wedding Planner, Wedding Budget, Wedding Coordinator | No Comments

Over the past few days, we’ve been breaking down the 5 biggest wedding myths. Today we’re tackling Myth 5: DIY/”Friend-or” weddings.

The DIY movement enpowers brides and grooms to add personal elements to their event, and fold in their buddies to the big day, as well.  We’ve had friends play guitar for the ceremony, or brides bake a grooms cake – small contributions make up for big, heartfelt gestures. But totally replacing a major vendor with a friend or your own DIY efforts? That’s flirting with – or hurtling headlong into – disaster.

One of the best examples of this myth is the “FRIEND DJ.” (Settle in kids – I’ve got a few fun stories for ya.)

Here’s the thing: music is inescapable. If the music is suddenly off, the WHOLE crowd notices. It’s also the international sign for, “Show’s over, Folks! Time to leave!” Unlike a drink that is a little too strong for one particular guest, or one centerpiece that is a bit wilty on a table of twelve, the music is everywhere and affects everyone, not just a handful of guests. Thus, your wedding tunes have a huge impact on the success of your event. At the end of the day, how much are you really saving?

A bride wisely provided her own lovely and easy to assemble candle centerpieces, but hired a professional florist (Lotus and Lily) for the more complex bouquets.

A bride wisely provided her own lovely and easy to assemble candle centerpieces, but hired a professional florist (Lotus and Lily) for the more complex bouquets. Photo by Katie Robertson Photography.

We no longer work events where a “friend is managing an Ipod,” and per our contract, all non-professional vendors are SOLELY responsible for the integrity of their work. For example, we’ve had a “friend-DJ” space out and not immediately turn the music back on after the bouquet toss, causing confusion and guests to start leaving. After our urging to get the music on, he panicked and had a hard time finding the next song – and by then, in just that minute or two that passed, we lost a dozen guests at a wedding that already had a low guest count. The wedding died out shortly thereafter.

At another event, a “friend DJ” did not know at all how to work the rental equipment, and had to use the one speaker on the venue’s property. This speaker was a low-quality piece of equipment that was typically used for the less complicated ceremony sound. So, it sounded muffled – like it was underwater: in a word, terrible. Even worse, this DJ started using an online song source ON HIS PHONE. The music stopped every time his phone buffered!

I mean it: Get a professional DJ, florist, officiant, – the whole nine yards. Also, most venues now require every vendor to have insurance, so right off the bat that takes away the option to involve an amateur.  Reserve friends’ talents for small touches, like providing the ingredients and recipe for their special signature cocktail, or to craft a lovely gift card box for you. Otherwise, let the pros safeguard your beautiful day with their savvy services.

Apply your talents to DIY touches you can do well before the event – like namecards, table numbers, or other printed goods.  Definitely don’t try florals – honestly, that’s a whole other blog post – unless you’re pre-building tissue or paper florals.

Make sure your vendors know your tastes and preferences so that the day is still all about you and your fiance’s personality – and then you, and your friends, can just relax and enjoy the day.  Happy planning!

The Five Biggest Wedding Planning Myths – Myth #4: “I can coordinate my own wedding!”

By | 5 Biggest Wedding Planning Myths, Day of Coordinator, Five Biggest Wedding Planning Myths, Los Angeles Wedding Coordinator, Los Angeles Wedding Planner, Wedding Consultant, Wedding Coordinator | No Comments

#4 in our series of the Five Biggest Wedding Planning myths: The risks of not working with a professional wedding coordinator.

Certainly, a bride or groom with common sense, an eye for numbers, and solid time management skills allow him or her to organize a wedding from the ground up. But no matter how on point you are, you need to be present as the guests of honor on your wedding day, not actually ‘working’ the day itself. It’s like a play – the lead actors cannot also serve as the stage managers!

Also there are logistical and permitting issues at play in a variety of cities, that the layperson is not aware of. Having the bare minimum of expertise to guide your wedding will save you from doing the dirty work of brass-tacks logistics.

A few things to keep in mind:

Vendors do not all communicate with each other or the venue. In other words, they often don’t know what they don’t know about each particular wedding until someone shows them a timeline, a scout video, etc. Once they receive that initial information, numerous questions and concerns come to the fore, and a coordinator can then expertly answer them, while the client focuses on more fun things – attending a flower mockup, trying on the dress one more time, and sorting out her guest list.

Most other vendors – like the DJ, onsite banquet captain, or photographer – hate taking over as coordinator. They do not have time to answer multiple questions or perform certain tasks (i.e., repurpose the bridesmaid bouquets to the head table; discuss adjusting the main course service time due to the bride and groom taking last minute sunset shots; coaching the terrified maid of honor through a dry run of her toast, etc.). The DJ is constantly adjusting volume and his or her mixing board, double-checking the speaker system, and prepping for the next toast or announcement. Your photographer is catching the most essential, important moments of one of the biggest days of your life, scanning the room for those special moments. They do not have ample time to circle back with the banquet captain to keep things flowing. The biggest danger here is going seriously off your timeline and running so late that you go into overtime with your vendors or the venue.

Having a chat with a Maid of Honor before the ceremony.  Photo by Wasserlein Photography.

Having a chat with a Maid of Honor before the ceremony. Photo by Wasserlein Photography.

Experience counts. There is no governing body that declares someone fit to start an event planning or coordination business. No bar exam to pass, or board certification to earn. Anyone an their mother (literally) can sell themselves as a planner, with little to no practical experience.

The assistance that a good, qualified coordinator provides is evident throughout the planning process, as well. Here’s an example of just a small percentage of the work – the tip of the iceberg, really – we recently provided to a coordination client:

  1. Advised on floor plan and gave floor plan changes to the venue manager, who mis-read them twice. That’s about 30 minutes and 4 emails back and forth that we took on, on behalf of the client. This is just a small sample of the hours and number of emails (typically 600-800 per event) that we expend on behalf of a client.
  2. Provided ideas for how to create risers and, thus, more space, on their favor table so there was enough room for their cute but bulky favors.
  3. Consulted with their DJ on a jam-packed timeline to ensure it went smoothly on the day-of. I sent multiple emails back and forth and drafted at least 3 revisions of the timeline, and ran it past multiple other vendors to ensure it worked with their service time frames.
  4. Advised on quantities for dessert bar; myself and my associate sat on hold multiple times with the bakery to discern how long the desserts would be stable at room temp, as well as to confirm delivery time.
  5. On the day of, we dealt with serious issues at the venue on the clients’ behalf. First, we showed the venue manager the contract to ensure everything we and the client originally confirmed with them, was provided accordingly. Then, we asked for a $500 credit at the bar for the client…and got it.

A coordinator protects your best interests and removes a lot of wasted time and guesswork from your planning process. As soon as you hire one, you’ve come the closest to truly guaranteeing your emotional and financial investment in the big day is fully realized.

Our door is always open for a complimentary consultation about the peace of mind and stress savings a coordinator can provide.  We can be reached at dee@noworriesep.com or 310-562-3306.

Five Questions to Ask a Wedding Planner or Coordinator

By | Day of Coordinator, Event Planner, Los Angeles Wedding Coordinator, Los Angeles Wedding Planner, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

It’s engagement season (apparently!) – vendors in our industry have a swell in inquiries at the turn of the New Year. The holidays are a busy time for popping the question.

As couples shop for a planner or coordinator, here are a few questions to ask each candidate:

1.  How long have you been doing this? If the planner is relatively new, they still may have lots of experience working for a few other planners, and/or have related experience (like TV or film production, project management, or catering).

2.  What type of venues do you usually work? This is a top question to ask if you are getting married in a more complicated space – like a private estate, state park, beach, or other outdoors, rustic space where everything needs to be brought in – from lighting to power to outside catering. There are all sorts of permitting and logistical issues that the inexperienced planner cannot foresee. Also, staffing and pre-production of these types of events is quite a bit more than a ‘typical’ planning or coordination service, so if the cost is too good to be true, they could be underestimating their production needs.

Yours truly, working a wedding while 4 months pregnant.

3.  Is this your full time job? This is on a lot of ‘questions to ask planners” list, and I don’t necessarily think it’s a fair one. In this economy, I’d give a lot of leeway to planners and pros that have freelance and/or part time jobs to supplement their income while their business strengthens.  An outstanding professional with flexible work hours can make the weekday walkthroughs, afternoon rehearsals, and return your calls and emails within a reasonable amount of time.  Checking references may be the call here to ease your mind of their abilities to multitask.

4.  Give me an example of how you ‘saved the day.’ It could be little things – like reminding a friend-officiant to sign the marriage license (!) – or realizing a few items were missing from the rental order.  Or, for a full wedding planner, it could be an example where they saved the client hundreds to thousands of dollars in negotiation.

Photo by L.A. Color Studio / http://www.lacolorstudio.com/

5.  Why do you do this? Funnily enough, I’ve never been asked this, but I’ve started bringing it up. If you ask this question to a potential candidate, the answer may allow you to see into their personality far more deeply than just ‘talking shop.’  How your personalities click is important, and asking what their motivation is to do the work can be a great way to gain insight into what makes them tick.

As for us, we’re an open book – ask us anything! And if we’re not available on your date, we have awesome colleagues in the industry we happily refer to.  Happy planning!

“I Couldn’t Have Done It Without You!”

By | Event Planner, Los Angeles Wedding Coordinator, Uncategorized, Wedding Consultant, Wedding Coordinator, Wedding Planner | No Comments

I was recently asked by a DJ friend of mine to compile real world examples from clients, and my own experience in events, about why at least a day of coordinator is vital to a smooth running wedding day.  He occasionally runs into a client that thinks they can do without; of course, this kills him because it means more work for him, and there are so many other things he can’t handle on his own that the client still has to deal with.  Here are a few examples of how coordinators and planners are crucial to the process:

  1. – Recently at a wedding, the banquet manager stopped me cold during setup and told me quite rudely that the dessert table was going to trigger a $500 ‘outside food’ fee.  I told him this had been waived by the catering sales manager and that certain verbiage listed on the BEO (banquet event order) designated this.  He said that wasn’t enough notation and he insisted upon charging the clients.  Had I not been there, the bride would have had to have dealt with this guy’s attitude, and it would have ruined her day.  We worked with the original sales manager to make sure it was not charged, and the bride had not a clue about the showdown till after (when she begged us to tell her about any hiccups that day).  I have written a letter in complaint as well to make sure the property is aware of this gentleman’s (ha!) attitude.
  1. – A client had a makeup test prior to her big day; the makeup artist got a parking ticket, and tried to get my client to pay for it! I knew the artist and called her immediately.  She admitted she would pay for it instead, and my client didn’t have to deal with it or pay the fine.
  1. – A bride and groom booked a DJ company with a bridal show discount.  It allowed for additional hours without extra charge.  When the date got closer, my contact at the DJ company switched from the sales department to the operations manager; the manager wanted to charge them FOR the extra hours because he did not technically approve the original rate.  I got on the phone with him (the Friday the week before the wedding,mind you!),  armed with email confirmations from the sales associate, and spoke with him for 20 minutes to get him to remove the charge – saving my clients $200.
  1. Timing and logistics:  We’ve caught everything from strict venue curfews that would have triggered removal of  the bride off property for the ‘first look’ shot, to resolving conflicting vendor time frames that would trigger photographer overtime fees, to permit issues that would potentially cause the city to shut down a wedding.

Dee on the job, chatting with the maid of honor at a Lindley-Scott House wedding. Photo by Wasserlein Photography.

Clients say:

“We had absolutely no stress on our wedding day because we knew all of the logistics, details, and coordinating were all taken care of.  It is also extremely important to have a coordinator so that your family and friends can enjoy the day alongside of you.  No member of the wedding is running around fixing problems on that day.”

“As a Mother of the Bride living out of state, I had plenty of time to help, [but] could only do online research or make phone calls. That quickly became discouraging with so many vendors, price points, services, reviews and testimonials to consider but no ability to meet people and see places for myself.   A few friends whose daughters had recently married in destination weddings were full of advice and tales of woe over the costly mistakes they had made and the regrets they had, and their budgets were much higher than ours. One excellent piece of advice was to hire a wedding planner or at least a day-of coordinator so that I could enjoy being the MOB while someone else handled the logistics. From that moment I was able to relax and enjoy the whole process.  The wedding was the beautiful, enchanted event we all hoped it would be and I have not a single regret. Nothing went wrong!”

“Thank you for making my dream wedding come to life.  I’m still getting comments about how relaxed I seemed that day and it’s all thanks to you!!! I couldn’t have done it without you!”

We also provide a complementary consultation to every potential bride and groom, no cost or obligation.  If you want to hear more war stories and how we prevented so many form happening to our own clients, give us a call at 310-562-3306.  Happy planning!