Category Archives: Business Consulting for Creatives

Increase SEO: How to Make Blogging A Regular Habit

By | Blogging for Wedding Planners, Blogging Tips, Business Consulting for Creatives, Business Development, Finding Time to Blog, Wedding Consultant, Wedding Coordinator | No Comments

How many times have you been told to calendar your marketing activities, just as if they were client appointments?  “Then THAT way I’ll actually blog/social post/network on a regular basis, like I’m supposed to!”, you keep thinking.  Well, as someone who worked in the events industry, thus with a mutable, ever-changing schedule, this just wasn’t working.  What did work? Making it a habit. I didn’t set a perfect schedule – but still managed to blog every 7 to 10 days for the majority of my business, creating a valuable niche audience and consistent engagement and SEO.  Read below to find out how I made blogging a regular part of my business, with a minimum of effort.

Make blogging a weekly habit

There’s a difference between scheduled activities and habitual activities.  For example, I now workout about 5 times a week.  In my head, I know that I will probably not workout 1x over the weekend due to famliy activities, and probably 1x during the week depending on what networking event or other work-related activities may pop up.  I simply then workout the other evenings when I’m free.  I started this routine for 2-3 weeks, and now, it’s like clockwork.  Every night that I arrive home and don’t have somewhere else to go to, I simply change into my workout gear, and once my son is done with his homework and dinner, I … work out. I don’t calendar it, I just do it.  I have a WEEKLY quota – i.e., “Workout regularly” is my weekly task, not a daily one.

The same has to happen for your blogging.  Make a note at the beginning of every week:  “Write one blog post.”  Every time you sit down to your computer, think, “Do I have time to work on my blog?”  Take 5 minutes if you can to add to your list of ideas, to shoot an email to a photographer to get photos of your latest wedding, or to log into the backend of your website to draft the first few words of your blog.  If that’s all you can handle, no problem.  Next time you sit down to your computer, ask yourself again if you have time to work on the blog. Even better, stick a post it on your computer that always says, “Blog!” and you’ll find yourself tackling your posts once you’re done with the main business of the day.

The reason why I suggest this for event planners, is because if we try to calendar in these regular marketing tasks, these appointments with ourselves nearly ALWAYS get kicked of the calendar by a last minute errand for a client, a meeting that FINALLY came together for a site inspection, etc. etc.  Our work is not desk-based- we’re running around all over the place, so it’s harder to lock in times and dates for this type of computer-based work since we’re not always sitting at a laptop.  These tasks have to surround our other work, and slot into our schedule once we find we have a free moment.

For me, the best time was always late afternoon or early evening, when everything was done for the day. I would find myself with about 20 minutes left to work on social media or blogging.  After awhile, it became such a habit, that I automatically would start to work on blogging once my day was complete – I didn’t have to look at a checklist to remind myself. It became…a habit.

Paris wedding destination planner Blogging

Blogging about my first Paris wedding led to other online inquiries, and, you guessed it, more Paris weddings! Photo by Yann Audic of Lifestories Wedding, dress by Vera Wang.

Small tasks lead to big momentum

It’s proven that starting small on an initiative leads to larger tasks being completed. So, say you have a stolen 5 minutes as you wait for a client to arrive for a meeting – that’s a great time to add blog ideas to your Notes app on your phone. Or, you find yourself done with a timeline draft earlier than you thought, and have a few minutes before tackling your next to-do of the day.  Take that stolen 20 minutes and upload some photos to your website for a ‘real wedding’ inspiration post.  By the end of the week, you will likely have a completed blog post.  Using these small slots in your day for mini-tasks, pays off in a big way.

Ask for help, if needed, to maintain your blogging calendar

There are also people who just don’t enjoy writing, unlike me (I liked it better than the actual wedding planning, believe it or not!) – and there are so many resources on the web for assisting your blog creation. Search Instagram, sites like Fiverr, Facebook, and other portals to find cost effective bloggers to assist you in pulling photos, drafting posts, even writing entire posts.  Interns and assistants can also make big progress for you behind the scenes, so you feel a sense of momentum without the struggle of putting pen to paper (or rather, finger to key).

Is blogging really that important these days?

Yes! It is.  Google is still a hungry beast for keywords (learn more about a key shift in their algorithms here, and the latest update here), and if you feed the beast, your SEO will increase, and you’ll start getting inquiries and collaboration requests from related brands that will even further increase your visibility.  Due to my solid SEO, I was able to branch out into corporate events, for example, as well as draw in wedding inquiries.  And, aside from a small investment into freelancers or your assistant, should you go that route, it’s a very low cost enterprise – with rich returns.

With this advice, you’ll be well on your way to making blogging a regular part of your work week.

Need any more tips or insight into your social media strategy?  Email me at dee@noworriesep.com and I’ll be happy to help!

Keep Those Clients Coming: How To Build Your Referral Business

By | Business Builders, Business Consulting for Creatives, Business Development, Getting More Clients, Networking, Oscar Party Tips | No Comments

After I wound down my wedding planning company, I started working in venue sales.  When I interviewed with prospective employers, they always asked me what my approach would be to selling.  All I had to say was, when I first started my company, I had to start from nothing, and at first, nearly every single piece of business, every client, I earned was from an outbound lead.  It was all about attracting clients in any way possible – a huge hustle.

In other words, unlike a big, well known company or name brand – like Four Seasons, say, or The Gap – I had no brand awareness, not even many contacts, in either the wedding industry or the world at large. I had to hustle.  But, it worked; my first year, I booked 16 weddings, and by year 3, I had a fully booked calendar, almost purely from referral (the small percentage that weren’t, were booked off my website). Here are a few tips on how I did it.

Meme wedding planning clients

Be a Diplomat – and Venues will Refer You To Clients

A major problem venues run into with their wedding planner colleagues are how biased they can be towards their clients. Now, of course, your client comes first.  But, clients are always right.  Yet, some event planners will take their clients’ completely unrealistic and unfair requests to the hotel or venue and make foolish and rude demands on their behalf.  Instead, the planner should lovingly and calmly educate their clients on how to modulate their request to be reasonable and realistic.  Wedding planners who do this not only have clients who appreciate their expertise and credibility, but they immediately rise to the top of most venues’ lists for referrals.  The majority of my referral business came from venues.

Beach Wedding Los Angeles With Tent

It’s all about your network! For this wedding, the hotel (Crowne Plaza Redondo Beach) referred me to the couple; then I referred them to the tent vendor (LM Productions), the DJ (Vox DJs), and the florist (Lotus and Lily). Photo by Nicole Caldwell Photography.

How do you promote your wedding planning business?

Good question – it’s different for everyone.  AND – for every region. I’m just gonna come out and say it, but here in L.A., using web platforms to advertise businesses really don’t seem to work enough for vendors out here, enough to achieve a meaningful ROI, anyways.  But, in other regions, these web platforms may work like gangbusters.  In my experience, clients here are investing a lot of money in we vendors (because we live in a big, expensive city, so we have to charge more, natch), and they don’t just want to grab a few names on line – they want someone they can trust.  Perhaps a DJ or even a caterer can be found online, but a wedding planner? That person is holding the keys to your entire event, and they know a lot of personal and financial information about you.  And you can ‘fake’ your portfolio – or at least embellish it- pretty easily.  Crazily enough, some wedding vendors and planners out here don’t even have websites. (Obviously that’s not best practice, but it shows you how powerful word of mouth is out here.)

That said, there are a lot of free websites and online portals where you can advertise for free – and you never know.  All you invest with these outlets is time, so it’s worth a try.  But tread carefully, ask lots of questions, and secure case studies from your niche and region before paying big bucks to advertise your wedding planning business.

Tie Up Those Loose Ends

Clients are more likely to refer you if you have no loose ends left with them after their event. Sometimes, clients will have lots of questions or issues with the end of their event unless you pre-empt the situation.  For example, always point out to multiple people, not just the couple, where their gift cards are in person to them before you leave, and take photos of where they are safely stored (I learned to do this after a 2am phone call from a mother of the bride who panicked because the bride and groom didn’t show them where they were when they gave them all their gifts at the end of the night).  If a vendor showed up late or you had an issue with timing due to circumstances beyond your control, be sure to calmly alert them in a friendly follow up email. If they feel you did a thorough job with concise follow-up, they’ll be more likely to refer you.

Network, Network, Network!

Go to as many networking events in and out of your industry as possible.  The fun of being a wedding planner means lots of wining, dining, and schmoozing.  Strike friendly and warm conversations; followup the next day or two with an email, and follow your new connections on social channels.  Often an event will clash with another one (they always seem to be on the same night!) so strategize wisely to stop by as many as you can.  Forming bonds and supportive connections means more referrals – and most of all, those connections mean warm friendships and support in an often demanding industry.

Have any questions?  Email me anytime at dee@noworriesep.com!

Bookkeeping for Event Planners: 3 Tips

By | Bookkeeping for Event Planners, Business Builders, Business Consulting, Business Consulting for Creatives, Business Development, How do I hire a Bookkeeper | No Comments

We all know as business owners that keeping track of expenses, saving for taxes, and making sure your books are balanced is so important.  But bookkeeping for event planners is not an easy thing at first, because of the unpredictable schedule of being a planner – working in the service industry means a lot of time on the road, in the field, and away from your administrative, desk-based tasks.  Here’s how I tackled tightening up my bookkeeping processes.

Hire a bookkeeper!

Hire a pro! They do not need to be full time.  I hired a bookkeeper for an initial analysis and software recommendations; quarterly checkins; and end of year profit-and-loss and tax prep.  It did not cost a fortune and truly worth every penny.

Bookkeeping for event planners calclutor accounting for creatives

Invoice online.

If you can’t afford taking credit cards – and if your revenue is unsteady or you are in the first 2-3 years of your business, that’s a smart call – see if there are any cloud-based, bookkeeping and invoicing systems that use ACH deposits to take from your clients.  Try to find something that schedules invoicing so you don’t have to think about it – clients get regular invoices on time, so that they are well aware of when their next payment is due.  Then as the cash comes in, the software keeps track of it, and balancing the books just got a lot easier.

Automate your tax savings.

This can be a super tough aspect of bookkeeping for event planners (I speak from experience!). What helped me was having my CPA give me tax projections in Q1 of every year.  Then, I could set aside – or at least manage expectations – of what my taxes would be. I got quite accurate at planning ahead and it saved me a lot of stress and sleepless nights.  Schedule quarterly or monthly allocations to a separate bank account for taxes, and plot reminders in your calendar throughout the year to send your payments to the IRS.  Or you can also ask your bookkeeper consultant to do this, and they can remind you.

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Don’t be afraid to hire a pro to help you manage this process – a little professional guidance means big time savings in stress, and possibly business fees and tax penalties.  Being organized = peak efficiency in all levels of your business!  And, I can’t recommend enough this book: Accounting for the Numberphobic.  It has outstanding small business advice and is actually pretty fun to read, too. Find it here – and happy planning!